Mad about attachments?

Emails with attachments are extremely common these days. For many of us it is an easy way to pass on information but do we ever stop to think of the inefficiency or time waste that opening and reading of attachments can create for the receiver. Is this not a cop out? Does it end up with a frustrated receiver? For example, does this email seem familiar:

QUOTE

To: Boss

Date:

From: 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Boss,

I have just returned from a three day meeting with the marketing team. Some really useful stuff and some things you may want to take note of.

Please find attached the 5 presentations that were made at the meeting. 

If you need anything else please let me know. 

Regards

Subordinate

UNQUOTE

So which of these is your response? 

1.) Thanks.

2.) Hmmm... Please set up a meeting once I have had a chance to work through the material ( 3 days). 

3.) Thanks for nothing. Suggest we discuss over your performance review.

Whilst the wording on the last response may be a little harsh and not used in an actual response, it gives you an idea of how one feels when receiving an email such as this.

Whilst email protocols do differ, a preferred note from the subordinate to his boss would have been:

QUOTE

To: Boss

Date:

From:

----------------------------------------------------

Dear Boss,

I have just returned from a three day meeting with the marketing team. Some really useful actions for us and some things you may wish to take note of.

The following are the key points of action or interest for us:

- point 1

- point 2

- point 3

etc.

If you would like to discuss any of the points made please let me know. I have attached the relevant presentations in case you would like a bit more detail.

If you need anything else please let me know. 


Regards

Subordinate

UNQUOTE

Good leaders will make sure their teams have a clear and adhered to protocol for using email. This saves a great deal of time for all and makes sure that only the relevant information is passed to where it is of use, rather than everyone suffering from further information overload.

Key Take-outs:

1.) Establish email rules and protocols in the team

2.) A summary of the main points at the start of an email is useful, makes reading easier and saves time (despite the fact that it may take longer to write the email)

3.) Always ask yourself if the attachment is really necessary and helpful to the receiver

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